Found 181 Papers
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Volume 2003
Employing Mobile Learning Technology To Augment Leadership Training At The Department Of Homeland Security (DHS)

Year: 2003

Author: Daniel Fox

Abstract:

As mobile devices and wireless technologies continue to mature in capability and security compliance, statistics and studies are beginning to show that there is much to gain in leveraging mobile technologies to augment training, provide on-the-job performance support, and support adult learning styles. In the U.S. alone, the mobile workforce is forecasted to double between now and 2006. By 2004, mobile devices will outnumber desktop computers by nearly 4 to 1. Mobile learning is especially conducive to those in leadership positions, where it provides the flexibility for combining ad hoc learning with work, family and social life. Mobile and wireless technologies help to blur the distinction between learning and work environments. Studies show that 70% of what employees learn is acquired through unstructured, unplanned, and unintended circumstances. For many executives, their "office" reaches beyond the physical boundaries of the traditional workplace. In addition, executives within rapidly changing agencies such as the former Immigration and Naturalization Services (today a part of the newly formed Department of Homeland Security) are expected to be mobile, agile, and responsive to meet mission-critical agency objectives. This paper presents a case study of how the INS has implemented the first building block for the next generation of organizational learning, moving from distance learning and electronic learning to mobile learning (mlearning). Mobile learning technologies were employed through the use of handheld devices in a pilot program delivered at the INS Leadership Development Center. This paper describes the results of the learning assessment, and discusses how personal digital assistants (PDAs) were leveraged to augment the Executive Edge classroom training experience. The paper also highlights outcomes achieved by the resulting mobile performance support/reference system and how it is assisting INS executives in meeting the challenging demands of their job.

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Navy Aviation Simulation Master Plan Requirements Analysis

Year: 2003

Authors: Robert Guptill, Mark Hemenway

Abstract:

Erosion of aviation readiness through the Inter-Deployment Training Cycle is a major concern for Navy Type Commanders. In response to this concern, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations sponsored an in-depth analysis to identify the physical and functional requirements of training systems that meet operational training needs of post-Fleet Replacement Squadrons in selected aviation communities.

The Navy Aviation Simulation Master Plan (NASMP) Requirements Analysis was conducted to define these training requirements that will guide the design and development of effective and empowering mission simulation solutions for Fleet aviators. The initial NASMP Requirements Analysis identified operations training system requirements for the following Navy aircraft and their aircrew personnel: F/A-18C/E/F, E-2C, EA-6B; SH-60 B/F; MH-60S, EP-3E; P-3C, and E-6B.

This paper describes the technical approach that was used. The approach is comprehensive in scope, aggressive in its implementation, and included all of the training front-end analysis steps required to define Navy aviation mission, system function, aircrew task, training media, training system alternative (including utilization and cost), fidelity, and simulator functional requirements. An important feature of the approach was using the Universal Naval Task List├ŽNaval Mission Essential Task List Process to identify mission task requirements; and decomposing and linking these tasks to Navy Training and Readiness task lists, and individual, team and collective aircrew task performance requirements.

Lessons learned include the efficacy of mission-based task analysis, reconciling semantic and operational differences in mission terminology and usage, shortcomings in MIL-PRF-29612 mission analysis guidance, reconciling task differences across Navy aircraft communities, the need for validated models to conduct utilization and cost analyses, and the critical need for a comprehensive, accessible, and current training requirements analysis database to host the data, conduct requirements analyses, and report results.

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The Grand Illusion, Twenty Five Years of Smoke and Mirrors

Year: 2003

Author: CW4 Clifford N. Cox

Abstract:

For 25 years I/ITSEC participants have eagerly sought to immerse themselves in the latest offerings of computergenerated visual wizardry. We even liken ourselves to fictitious sorcerers, possessing the power to transport willing participants to distant lands and future seasons using magical machines. Commonly however, we have drawn conflicting assumptions concerning what we are actually seeing and what can be accomplished within a virtual battle space. As we rival in our power to suspend disbelief and control the virtual universe, we must never forget that just as a dragon slayer can suddenly find himself the prey, we too are fallible, and can be easily swept away in the illusions we are attempting to create.

Like the novice magician who moves from simple card tricks to death defying exhibitions, it is common for simulation developers to misjudge the effectiveness and risks involved in the creation of new technology. Thus, cybernetic illusion will be presented as a two-edge sword and analyzed from four unique perspectives covering the critical aspects of physiological, marketing, process and seer illusion. Physiological illusion will be presented first in order to anchor some of the basic concepts that enable real-time imagery and suspension of disbelief. Marketing illusions will then address the incredible power of computer graphics to sell themselves and the attendant risks that all buyers should be aware of. Process illusion will delve further into how we often deceive ourselves when building training systems designed to meet government requirements. And last, seer illusion will address the inherent problems associated with predicting the performance and development of future applications that will be used by 21st century warriors, who must exploit the power of virtual reality to think, train, and win on the digital battlefield.

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The UK HFI Defence Technology Centre: Background, Research & Collaboration

Year: 2003

Author: Robert J.

Abstract: A 2002 initiative

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Network Centric Warfare: Metrics for Assessing FORCEnet Human Performance Solutions

Year: 2003

Author: Robert Breaux

Abstract:

The Navy's Transformation Roadmap, signed jointly by Secretary of the Navy, Commandant of the Marine Corps and Chief of Naval Operations, details the plans for SeaPower 21 and the Navy's move into the Information Age. Successfully implementing Network Centric Warfare (NCW) will require a Human-Centered Design (HCD) approach to FORCEnet, on a scale unprecedented within the training community, that will ensure optimal warfighter performance. Thus, a robust set of human performance metrics will be required to guide the evaluation of solutions for design, training, manning, implementation and testing of FORCEnet.

This paper discusses various metrics that are under consideration, how metrics can be developed, how the metrics will be used for assessing system design and training solutions, and recommends an approach for developing additional metrics that will ensure fully qualified sea warriors for implementing FORCEnet in NCW.

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Successfully Upgrading Legacy Simulation Equipment Using the Value Methodology

Year: 2003

Author: Mr. Everette Stephens

Abstract:

Modernization of computer based training and simulation systems are an ever-present concern as hardware platforms mature, and software-operating systems improve. The struggle to balance the considerable investment in the legacy systems against the possible enhancements achievable by inserting new technology is best evaluated by multi-disciplined teams including users, maintainers, planners and developers.

The need for success validates the importance of conducting a focused work-study or workshop event to rapidly reduce complex problems/challenges to a workable solution. It demonstrates that teamwork provides the needed capabilities and achieves across-the-board acceptance, especially by those who have to implement the results. Use of the Value Methodology allowed several diverse ideas to be compared to one another. The teams looked at feasibility, risk, cost and life cycle considerations while maintaining focusing on the functions and meeting the customers needs and expectations.

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Supporting Distributed Simulation on Scalable Parallel Processor Systems

Year: 2003

Authors: Richard Williams, John J. Tran

Abstract:

The Distributed Continuous Experimentation Environment (DCEE) is a permanent simulation infrastructure being set up by U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) to support Joint experimentation. DCEE will combine simulations running on both local JFCOM networks and Scalable Parallel Processor (SPP) networks. JFCOM has been working to develop tools to manage a large number of simulation computers with a minimal number of technical support personnel. These tools allow an operator to start and stop various applications, monitor and graph machine resources, generate simulation routing topologies, check network connectivity, and perform these functions in a secure environment.

As DCEE planning continues, the requirement for centralized federation control becomes obvious. The challenge of remotely coordinating the operation of hundreds or possibly thousands of simulation applications looms ever larger. The fact that numerous machines may exist on remote networks further complicates this issue. As an integral element of DCEE, centralized control will need to be expanded to manage and monitor SPP networks along with existing systems.

This paper will address the complex challenges of controlling and monitoring an extensive simulation environment. The paper will introduce the environment, describing the simulations and the SPP. The paper shall also discuss the operational and technical advantages using a centralized set of tools. The paper will not only examine the challenges encountered by attempting to run simulations on SPP networks, but also how these challenges are met.

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Flight Simulator Utilization To Augment Operational Testing - One Year Update

Year: 2003

Authors: David Kirchner, R. H. Taylor

Abstract: The potential utilization of the USAF Distributed Mission Operation-Aircrew (DMO-A) initiative's Mission Training Center (MTC) resources to augment the test activities of the Air Warfare Center's 53d Wing (53WG) were discussed at I/ITSEC 2002. In this update to the 2002 paper, specific activities and utilizations of simulator assets by the F-15 Combined Test Force (CTF), the 85th Test and Evaluation Squadron, the 28th Test Squadron, and the 422nd Test and Evaluation Squadron that have occurred within the previous year are presented. Progress and lessons learned associated with the 53WG's implementation of a Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology are discussed, with emphasis on the role of simulator assets within the DoE implementation. Finally, the relative importance of using validated simulator models is re-examined, with an examination of the practice of using flight simulators for tactics development prior to formal validation activities.

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Train as you Fight - Design and Integration Issues for Embedded Training in the Future Combat System

Year: 2003

Authors: Henry Marshall, Gary Green

Abstract:

For the past six years embedded simulation research has focused on methods to transform digital-based current force systems, such as the latest version of Abrams tank and Bradley Fighting Vehicle, into systems capable of supporting embedded individual, crew and unit training. This research was spearheaded by the Inter-Vehicle Embedded Simulation Technology (INVEST) Science and Technology Objective (STO). While many technologies still required improvement to meet onboard training needs and size limitations, the INVEST program had great success in demonstrating the potential of the technology for both current and future programs. Based in part on the success of the INVEST program, the Army decided in 2003 to make fully embedded simulation a requirement for Future Combat System (FCS). This paper discusses research focused on embedded simulation capabilities for the FCS.

The Embedded Combined Arms Team Training and Mission Rehearsal (ECATT/MR) STO was initiated in FY03 to explore risk areas for FCS embedded simulation. As a new system start, FCS has the advantage of building embedded technology into the fundamental architecture of the system rather than having to add it later to a fielded system. However, development is complicated by the fact that neither the FCS vehicles nor FCS doctrine are yet defined. This paper discusses the development and application of an embedded testbed as an aid to FCS embedded training concept exploration. The paper discusses testbed use to define a fundamental embedded interface that will permit embedded components to interoperate via a network for large exercises and mission rehearsal. Other technologies being explored for FCS are also discussed such as the vehicle-soldier linkage for dismounted infantry training, intelligent tutoring and the use of C4ISR to control computer generated forces. The paper concludes with a discussion of future work.

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Reuse Potential Of Legacy Simulators To Suport DMO

Year: 2003

Author: Garry H Boyle

Abstract: Modeling and simulation has become an increasingly more important contributor to mission readiness. Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) has the potential for big payoff in terms of peacetime Aerospace Expeditionary Force (AEF) and coalition preparation as well as operational joint mission rehearsal. There is an enormous residual investment in existing simulation-based training devices that were not designed for DMO. The question arises as to whether these legacy or fielded simulator systems can be used to support DMO objectives and the training needs of tomorrow? The answer to this question is an important one because of its potential economic impact and it can spread DMO to more systems earlier. At the same time, the answer can be unique to each system since it will be based on many variables. Legacy systems are plagued with concurrency problems, exorbitant life-cycle costs, obsolete computer systems, and a lack of networking capability. Other variables include funding, contract issues, ownership of aircraft and simulator software, ripple effects of changes, and having the right personnel. There have been various legacy simulator systems that have gone through a redesign and refurbishment to provide enhanced training capabilities including Distributed Mission Training (DMT). The Air Force Research Laboratory, Warfighter Training Research Division, has had significant experience in integrating existing systems into DMT and reusing elements of legacy systems to meet new training requirements. We have seen the extreme of integrating DMT capabilities into an existing system to a simple offering of the cockpit and existing software as resources in a follow-on RFP for a new simulator system. This paper addresses the variables, their implications, actual conversion experiences, recommendations, and lessons for future simulator procurements to ensure that the next generation of simulators will have the capability to meet yet undetermined future needs.

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